Microscopy

A whole           in a drop.

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Top left : Detail of a single Sumac seed.

 

Top right : Young Sumac branches

 

Bottom right : Sumac leaf detail with small hairs and growths emanating from the leaf veins.

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Stag Horn Sumac, found in many gardens of Europe, gets its name from the soft fine hairs covering the young branches, so resembling stag’s horns. The striking fruits known collectively as Drupes are covered tiny red hairs. The green body of the fruits exude a citrus like sap, containing mainly ascorbic acid (vitamin C), that can be washed off with cool water and filtered to produce a pale pink cordial.

 

The small structures growing from the leaf vein are known as generally Trichores, some even look like microscopic versions of the Sumac fruit itself. The exact function isn’t known but they are thought to aid in leaf transpiration and possibly defence against insect attack.

 

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Stag Horn Sumac

Garden Exploration

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